L’Oreal is Racist

loreal.jpg

Apparently in France, “You’re worth it” only if you are white. The cosmetics giant L’Oréal was found guilty yesterday of racial discrimination after it sought to exclude non-white women from promoting its shampoo. I read this article in the London Guardian today and had to double check my calendar that it is indeed 2007 and not 1967. From the article:

“In a landmark case, the Garnier division of the beauty empire, along with a recruitment agency it employed, were fined €30,000 (£20,300) each after they recruited women on the basis of race. The historic ruling – the first time a major company has been found guilty of systematic race discrimination in France – saw a senior figure at the agency given a three-month suspended prison sentence.

The French campaign group SOS Racisme brought the case against L’Oréal, the world’s largest cosmetics firm, over the campaign in 2000. Garnier France sought saleswomen to demonstrate the shampoo line Fructis Style in supermarkets outside Paris. They sought young women to hand out samples and discuss hairstyling with shoppers. In July 2000, a fax detailing the profile of hostesses sought by L’Oréal stipulated women should be 18 to 22, size 38-42 (UK size 10-14) and “BBR”, the initials for bleu, blanc, rouge, the colours of the French flag. Prosecutors argued that BBR, a shorthand used by the far right, was also a well-known code among employers to mean “white” French people and not those of north African, African and Asian backgrounds.

Christine Cassan, a former employee at Districom, a communications firm acting for Garnier, told the court her clients demanded white hostesses. She said that when she had gone ahead and presented candidates “of colour” a superior in her own company had said she had “had enough of Christine and her Arabs”.”

Complete article here.

Beauty Snob note: L’Oreal USA was not mentioned in the suit and I feel compelled to mention that I often notice that gorgeous women of all ethnic backgrounds are featured in L’Oreal USA ads.


LONDON GUARDIAN

You’re worth it – if white. L’Oréal guilty of racism

· Cosmetic giant fined for recruitment campaign

· First big French firm to be convicted of racial bias

Angelique Chrisafis in Paris

Saturday July 7, 2007

The Guardian

Part of the cosmetics giant L’Oréal was yesterday found guilty of racial discrimination after it sought to exclude non-white women from promoting its shampoo.

In a landmark case, the Garnier division of the beauty empire, along with a recruitment agency it employed, were fined €30,000 (£20,300) each after they recruited women on the basis of race. The historic ruling – the first time a major company has been found guilty of systematic race discrimination in France – saw a senior figure at the agency given a three-month suspended prison sentence.

The French campaign group SOS Racisme brought the case against L’Oréal, the world’s largest cosmetics firm, over the campaign in 2000. Garnier France sought saleswomen to demonstrate the shampoo line Fructis Style in supermarkets outside Paris. They sought young women to hand out samples and discuss hairstyling with shoppers.

In July 2000, a fax detailing the profile of hostesses sought by L’Oréal stipulated women should be 18 to 22, size 38-42 (UK size 10-14) and “BBR”, the initials for bleu, blanc, rouge, the colours of the French flag. Prosecutors argued that BBR, a shorthand used by the far right, was also a well-known code among employers to mean “white” French people and not those of north African, African and Asian backgrounds.

Christine Cassan, a former employee at Districom, a communications firm acting for Garnier, told the court her clients demanded white hostesses. She said that when she had gone ahead and presented candidates “of colour” a superior in her own company had said she had “had enough of Christine and her Arabs”.

One woman working in the recruitment firm involved said foreign-sounding names or photos showing a candidate was of Moroccan, Algerian, Tunisian or other African origin would ensure candidates were eliminated. Another said: “I once had a good woman candidate but she was non-white. I had to ask someone to pretend that our list was full. It was hard.”

One experienced candidate said she realised she was not eligible because she was of mixed race. In a normal sample of women recruited for similar sales work, around 40% would be non-white. For the Fructis project, less than 4% were of “non-European” origin.

SOS Racisme said hundreds of jobs had been subject to discrimination in the case. Garnier and the recruitment company were initially acquitted last year, but the appeal court yesterday overturned the ruling. A former Garnier head and a senior recruitment agency executive were acquitted.

Anti-racism campaigners in France hailed the ruling. Racial discrimination in employment is a huge problem in France with a recent survey finding three out of four firms preferred white workers.

President Nicolas Sarkozy’s new justice minister, Rachida Dati, the first woman of north African origin to hold a ministerial post, has ruled that special departments in prosecutors’ offices should be set up to deal with race discrimination.

Samuel Thomas of SOS Racisme told the Guardian: “This ruling is an enormous victory for everyone currently suffering race discrimination in France. It shows that economic interests cannot be put before the law and morality. Companies here clearly thought that racism was in their financial interest.”

He said consumers of L’Oréal products in the UK and the US would be horrified to learn about the racial discrimination.

L’Oréal owns brands ranging from Lancôme to the Body Shop, which it bought last year. It said yesterday it would immediately appeal against the decision, which it found “incomprehensible”.

“We believe that diversity and difference are a source of richness and we do not tolerate any form of racism or discrimination,” the statement said.

The company was hoping for an altogether different type of publicity in France this weekend when it created a special lipstick for the Paris wedding of Desperate Housewives’ star Eva Longoria to the French basketball player Tony Parker.

Century of beauty

L’Oréal was founded in 1907 by a French chemist who invented one of the first synthetic hair dyes.

It is the world’s biggest beauty products company and owns brands from Maybelline to Helena Rubinstein and the Body Shop. In the 90s L’Oréal was hit by claims over past links to fascism, anti-semitism and the giving of jobs to Nazi collaborators after the second world war. It went some way to satisfy its critics with a boardroom change and other measures. Liliane Bettencourt, L’Oréal’s major shareholder, is the wealthiest woman in France. Two years ago L’Oréal’s slogan was softened from “Because I’m worth it” to “Because you’re worth it” after concerns in France that the original appeared too money-oriented.

70 thoughts on “L’Oreal is Racist

  1. you won’t see me buying l’oreal products anytime soon!

  2. Lindsey on said:

    I thought Asians are known for their

    beautiful hair anyways.

    I understand there is a big market for white women, but actually saying things like BBR? Yuk. Shame on L’oreal!

  3. Janiece on said:

    Thanks for the information! As an African-American woman I refuse to give my money to any corporation who deems me unworthy/undesirable.

  4. Taysha Smith Valez on said:

    This is nothing new. As a black woman, of Latin , and french “makeup” no pun ,and very successful in the cosmetics industry I might add , I must tell you that this has been known for ages . And they are not the only ones who currently have this view of people. Its a shame but very true. And the company is the largest cosmetics company in the world right now! They own Bio therm , derma blend, Armani fragrances, Lancome and so on. Its sad but very true. Shaking my head .

  5. Anonymous on said:

    These are the people that own the body shop and maybelline. Loreal has drama ahead of the for sure.

  6. Beauty Snob, thanks for letting us know about this! I immediately forwarded this story to all my friends, and all were shocked!

  7. Fatima on said:

    This is nothing new!!! A majority of companies discriminate… L’Oreal just got caught! That’s why it’s always good to know the company behind the product! I’ve never supported L’Oreal and won’t! Shameful… (Head Shaking)

  8. Anonymous on said:

    I heard about this story but can’t help to think that this is probably going on everywhere but has just never been called out like this. Good job for the whistle blowers in this case. L’Oreal USA is actually one of the frontrunners in the industry who are making strides to research hair and skin of ethnic backgrounds, as they have a research lab dedicated to just that. As for L’Oreal Paris…I’m not surprised, but just very, very disappointed.

  9. Anonymous on said:

    ^^^ Don’t Believe the hype. Loreal USA is just as racist if not more. Its all the same company. They only have a “dedicated lab” because its good for their wallet, not because they care or respect the ethnic market. And they know “ethnic” rules the hair care market. Estee Lauder and all of their brands are just as bad. Do some google research on the brand. Like someone above said Loreal Paris just got caught. !

  10. Anonymous on said:

    You know what is really said ? People know this is going on and they dont care. They will continue to support because that is the way the world works. And Loreal USA and Paris are both known for this bull. So what they have women of color in their ad’s here in the USA. They have too!!!. Its not because they want to . But I understand why you guys put that disclaimer, don’t worry , we wont say beauty snob told us not to buy your products . You guys are not the only ones who reported this.

    In a nut shell its a sad but true reality regardless of what is “mentioned” in the above story.

  11. anonymous on said:

    Can you say, “Carol’s Daughter”? Can you say, “Warm Spirit”? Need I say anything else.

    Ladies stop giving your money to people who do not respect you, as a human being!!!

  12. Demetris on said:

    I am not shocked either. Isn’t the standard of beauty a skinny white woman with blonde hair ALL over the world? Shame, shame, shame.

  13. Anonymous on said:

    I love Carols Daughter and warm spirit but what about actual color makeup? Like eyeshadows , lipglosses and things. I don’t want to be mother earth natural all the time . I like high fashion and glam too!

  14. Gommie_Bears on said:

    This makes no sense what so ever. I am at a loss because L’Oreal owns several ethinic lines, including Mizani, Shu Uemura, SoftSheen Carson. Granted they were minority owned until they were acquired. When that occurred, I stopped using their products since they changed the ingredients by using inferior ingredients and yet charge premium price. Even this is L’Oreal Paris, I still vow not to use anything by them or their subsidiaries.

  15. Most people who buy makeup AREN’T white, and dont forget that Beyonce is ‘the face of L’Oreal’. We sit back and watch people like her and Toni Braxton get lighter skinned to blow up, and then blame the companies that exloit our color-struckness. We need to check ourselves instead.

  16. This is truly sad in 2007 but it’s reality and now I see why they had Beyonce pushing their products knowing that that Feria hair color isn’t for US. They used good old trickery there. If the world’s standard of beauty is a skinny, blonde chic, why do you have white women running to plastic surgeons to look like us? They want our full lips, our butts and most of all the tanning to sort of look like us. They want the sort of brown color but they don’t want to loose their whiteness. All these companies will market to the black community but half of them don’t put the research in to learn about the complexities of our skin and hair. That’s why I love Carol’s Daughter. What’s good for a white woman isn’t good for a black woman. Ethnic hair care products may run the industry but it’s not us behind the products. I read somewhere that Koreans own more than 50% of the companies that produce, sell and market haircare products to the ethnic markets. We need to step up and control what’s coming into our communities and most of all do your research before you buy.

  17. niecey on said:

    I am soooooo happy l’oreal has been penalized for the role they had in this horrible logo “because your worth it”! I wouldnot ever pattern myself after a white woman i am too proud of my exotic look as a woman of color! The french needs to ck again and also united states this isnot the 1920′s-1960′s time has aggressively changed the concept of beauty is by far “white”. Anyways are they even “white”? i thought they appeared to be more “pink”to me!

  18. Em Gee Eff Bee on said:

    I love L’oreal skincare line and I will use it regardless. It is the only thing that works for me. Carol’s Daughter is all hype to me. Tried it. Didn’t work.

    Anyway blacks are in the motions ads, not whites. I don’t use L’oreal hair products because I am black. I use Cantu and Motions.

    But when it comes to face care, I want the best and L’oreal and Clarins are the best!

  19. Opinionated Lady on said:

    It is not like they make foundation for minority women anyways.I’m not suprised.I never used their hair products so no shame in me!

  20. As of today, I will no longer use L’Oreal products. I used to use their skincare products too. Going forward I will see my Dermatologist for skincare products.

    So sad that some people still have those attitudes in this day and time. But I am pleased with the way France has chosen to handle it.

    Thanks for sharing this information.

  21. Skin doc girl on said:

    One of the Vice-Presidents for R&D is a sister-she’s at the Loreal Institute for Ethnic Skin Research in Chicago. Maybe your website should ask her opinion on the matter. I never hear much from her anyway.

  22. Anonymous on said:

    @Em Gee Eff Bee

    You are so lost …lolol.. Clarins is ok, and Loreal is even okaaaaaaayer. They are not the best . And carols daughter is not the only off color option. Do your research please i beg of you.

  23. Anonymous on said:

    Again what about cosmetics??? not just skin care?

  24. Amberlee on said:

    Real cosmetics is cool , i like their items

  25. Unfortunately this kind of practice is relatively common in France (though of course entirely illegal).

    Topic picked up at: http://shoppingbasket.wordpress.com/2007/07/10/l’oreal-found-guilty-of-racial-discrimination/

  26. A list of L’Oreal Brands … from their corporate website http://www.loreal.com:

    L’Oreal Paris

    Biotherm

    Cacharel

    Garnier

    Giorgio Armani

    Helena Rubinstein

    Inneov

    Keratase

    Kiehl’s

    Lancome

    La Roche-Posay

    L’Oreal Professionnel

    Le Club des Createurs

    Matrix

    Maybelline NY

    Mizani

    Ralph Lauren

    Redken

    Shu Uemura

    Skinceuticals

    Softsheen Carson

    The Body Shop

    Vichy

    Viktor & Rolf

    I am most disturbed by the following quotes from the Guardian article: “In a normal sample of women recruited for similar sales work, around 40% would be non-white. For the Fructis project, less than 4% were of “non-European” origin.”

    “[L'Oreal] would immediately appeal against the decision, which it found “incomprehensible”.

    “We believe that diversity and difference are a source of richness and we do not tolerate any form of racism or discrimination,” the statement said.”

    I don’t know which set of corporate feet this can be laid at: Garnier, L’Oreal Paris, or L’Oreal HQ. Regardless, I strongly disapprove of L’Oreal’s response, but I can not say that I am surprised.

  27. Africa on said:

    I’m not even surprised, i live in france and there’re racist all over !

    Shame !

  28. rosalyn on said:

    i just want to say when is Beyonce going to leave L’Oreal? Oh….

    i’ll definetly passt this info on to all my family and friends.

    i am glad that i support Carol’s Daughter. We all should continue to support our own.

    peace

  29. Minorities need to stop acting surprise. White companies make products specifically for them. And that is who they cater to, as a black woman, I can see the racism part, but let’s be real. In Europe or anywhere in the U.S. that sell these products , in a predominately white neighborhood, how many white women would actually buy a product that is being demonstrated on by a non white woman. Few years ago, Naomi Campbell got the cover of a major magazine, and suddenly she was replaced by Kate Moss. When the magazine was asked about the change, they responded that if whites were to see Naomi, they would assume that it’s a black magazine.

    So, in reality minorities just need to invest and produce their own products, and stop carrying so much about what white people do, when we are not their target anyways.

  30. Hmmm, I would typically say “only in America” but I guess that’s not the case. To think I am an avid L’Oreal consumer and here they are discriminating against women of color. We just can’t catch a break to save our lives. When is the world going to wake up? I’m tired of being told I’m not good enough just because of the color of my skin. L’Oreal won’t see another dime of my money. Looks like it’s back to Dark & Lovely and maybe Carol’s Daughter…

  31. hotcoffy007 on said:

    for those of you looking for a new cosmetics line to try i suggest Christian Dior, Yves St. Laurent,MAC,Kevyn Aucoin, Laura Mercier, Nars,Bobbi Brown,Iman Cosmetics and Prescriptives. for drugstore brands you can’t beat Covergirl,Revlon and Black Opal. for skincare, Peter Thomas Roth, Philosophy and M.D. Skincare,and the best wrinkle cream on the market is ROC, which can be found at your local drugstore.

    sorry to overload you.

  32. Anonymous on said:

    hotcoffy thanks for the suggestions. But Kevyn Aucion is the only brand on your list that does not come from a bigot based company. You need to do some real research on other brands because you are mislead as well.

    Bobbi Brown, MAC, Prescriptives: Are all Estee Lauder Brands , do your research on the foolishness that is Estee Lauder. No better then Loreal.

    Iman & Cover Girl : Are both Proctor and Gamble : Again no better then Loreal.

    Laura Mercier, YvesSTLaurent : Not to bad but limited.

    Revlon : You are joking right ? again nooo better then Loreal.

    I won’t even Break it down any further. My first line speaks for its self. Wake up people ! Just Wake up !

  33. Anonymous on said:

    @TT

    L’Oreal won’t see another dime of my money. Looks like it’s back to Dark & Lovely and maybe Carol’s Daughter…

    Posted by TT | July 17, 2007 12:00 PM

    They own Dark & Lovely too!.. Loreal Owns Dark & Lovely . Hello!

  34. Agnes Turner on said:

    I am shocked, appalled even though I don’t use Loreal, I most certainly will tell all my friends not to also. Beside, I am a Mary Kay Cosmetics Girl!

  35. Anonymous on said:

    No thank you on the Mary Kay , i will research newer brands who care about people as a whole not just because they mae financial sense.!

  36. Anonymous on said:

    There is NO company out there–in any industry or field–that “cares about people as a whole” anymore, if there ever was. It certainly doesn’t exist now; that’s just naive and unrealistic. The bottom line, it’s all about the money, wherever you go and whatever you buy. Few of us (black people, or racial/ethnic minorities, in general–with the exception of Asians) own any of these affiliates, so there probably are racist people making the majority of decisions. Therefore, we have two choices: once their racism is made known publically, we stop patronizing them in a unified manner–as Tavis Smiley states, that’s the only way to hit their pocketbooks in a major way. Alternatively, we can just be complacent and continue to use whichever products seem to work best for us. But it’s one or the other. Something to think about, definitely.

  37. Valerie on said:

    This should’nt come as a surprise to anyone, especially not in France where that is common practcie in all sectors of the industry only “underground”. I’ve started boycotting them a while ago when they were so famous for their experiments on animals but I did’nt know the extend of their empire, although I knew BODY SHOP had sold their sould to the Devil.

    So good tip to have the list handy.LET’S STOP FINANCING THOSE BIGOTS NOW….and see their empire falling down!!!!

  38. hotcoffy007 on said:

    wow, no good deed goes unpunished. :)

  39. Marcie from Nebraska on said:

    I don’t agree That “we” don’t own companies in this genre . “We” just don’t support or do research on the “WE’s” in this category”

    Fashion Fair is a 60 million dollar a year brand. HCouture Beauty is also a multimillion dollar a year company with multiple brands, Real Cosmetics is South Asian owned , Global Goddess which is owned by a woman of color is also doing well . All mentioned are not advertised and shoved down our throats like the others that’s the problem. But dont say things like “few of us (black people, or racial/ethnic minorities, in general–with the exception of Asians) own any of these affiliates, so there probably are racist people making the majority of decisions.”

    Thats not the issue the issue is us the Ethnic consumer and who we “CHOOSE” to spend our dollar with. We can’t blame anyone but ourselves.

  40. Marcie from Nebraska on said:

    Valerie I agree. There are so many brands to chose from that my list could go on forever. We just refuse to face the fact that we do “OWN OUR OWN” .

  41. Anonymous on said:

    You are right Marcie it is our faults that we accept what ever is shoved in our faces. Then we say stupid uneducated things like ” we don’t have optins, we don’t own anything”. i have had my share of clueless days and i am the first to admit that i have been blinded by the big wigs.

  42. Anonymous on said:

    Obviously, there are people who do not read thoroughly. I said, FEW of us own these makeup conglomerates (not that there aren’t some), which is true. Now certainly we could mobilize and be more influential, but I thought the point of this conversation was to identify the racist affiliates and stop patronizing them…apparently, L’Oreal being one of them. And I mentioned what our options are concerning this situation. Complacent attitudes such as the ones stated above are the reasons why we as black people are not entrepreneurs more often. We mistakenly believe everything is fine, and we la-di-dah along as if we’re on equal playing field with the majority race. NEWSFLASH: we’re not! Personally, I’ve never heard of any “Global Goddess” until just now because I’m not all that big into makeup (I don’t really need it, I’m a thirty-year-old who’s always told I look like a teenager) but whoever mentioned that, I sure hope you’re using it or some other supposedly black-owned makeup company’s products because if not, you’re a hypocrite. I myself am an entrepreneur: I own my own Christian fiction publishing company. Check yourself before you criticize good sound advice that’s simply saying we don’t need to rock back on our heels and think everything is peachy-keen when, by far, it is not.

  43. Anonymous on said:

    And did it ever occur to you that the majority race puts black faces and other minorities in visible positions because they know it’s so easy to fool us and we won’t do our research? Unless you have actually combed through the hierarchy of these organizations or you see a black person’s name (or any minority person’s name, for that matter) listed as CEO/CFO, anybody could be running the show. Drop some names for me with actual leadership titles, then maybe I’ll believe you. Don’t you see? Are we really that dense? It’s SO easy for them to work us. And as far as Fashion Fair, don’t EVEN get me started on that gooey, cakey crap. Whether it’s ACTUALLY black-owned or not, I won’t even venture to say, I haven’t researched the company hierarchy. I know that it’s marketed toward sisters and always has been, which is a shame, because anyone who has ever worn it, to me, looks like she’s been beaten and bruised up. It has such a harsh-looking effect, and 60 million-dollar grossing or not, we need to come up with something else.

    Please stop mindlessly ingesting all the baloney that’s out there and DO YOUR RESEARCH…I mean, REAL research and uncover who’s behind the TV screen and the magazine ads. THOSE people are the true owners.

  44. Anonymous on said:

    See…when you’re ignorant, people can take advantage of you, even with something as seemingly harmless as a makeup preference, but make no mistake…the makeup industry is a multi-billion dollar entity, and we as women spend more on it than we do clothes and jewelry combined. Therefore, this is where the victimization starts. “Let’s all run buy Fashion Fair or Global Goddess because it’s black-owned,” not even realizing you may be patronizing a majority-owned establishment that has head-honchos calling black people “monkeys” behind closed doors. Now, I have tried to be tactful in my submissions, but since some people didn’t fully read my comments earlier, hopefully you’ll read these. I don’t know if you’re in your twenties or just plain haughty or what, but YOU have no clue as to what you say. It breaks my heart to no end that people are programmed to believe whatever is shoved in their faces.

  45. Marcie from Nebraska on said:

    @anonymous

    Well i know for a fact that all the companies I mentioned are person of color owned and operated !! . I never said just black. Please RE READ my comment again. Thank You ! and again You do your research because you are indeed wrong! Stop being so mad and open your eyes to what we do have. Being angry blinds you from reality. And that my friend is what “they” want you to be Blind. So check my last post AGAIN! And when you make such open ended response expect a open ended response!

  46. Anonymous on said:

    I just became informed about Iman (yes, our famed sister who married Billy Idol), who owned her own makeup product line. Notice I said, “owned,” past tense–she sold her company to Proctor & Gamble. Yet, many of us are probably still buying these products thinking we’re supporting a sister on the move. But this is what happens when WE DON’T DO OUR RESEARCH. Tsk, tsk, tsk…shame, shame, shame…

  47. Marcie from Nebraska on said:

    You are so right about IMAN . That is why she is not on the list that I mentioned above . Because Some of us DO do our RESEARCH.

  48. Anonymous on said:

    Linda Johnson Rice, daughter of the late John H. Johnson, heads Fashion Fair, which is good to know. That Global Goddess stuff—for some strange reason, I can’t uncover enough information about them to tell. But I’ll keep looking. That’s what you do when you don’t have all the facts. You don’t mimic hoopla somebody else has spoonfed you, you keep looking until you find the REAL answers!

  49. Anonymous on said:

    @ Anonymus I think you inquired about age I am 46 years old far from twenty and I have met a few of these CEO’s and they are indeed of Color. Again stop being so angry and open your eye’s to what WE DO have NOT what WE Don’T. But i must agree with you on one thing. Its a shame that as soon as we create something grand we sell to those who dont have our best interest in mind. Hopefully the new comers in the game won’t give in so easy. And our dear Lost IMAN is married to DAVID BOWIE not Billy IDOL.

  50. Marcie from Nebraska on said:

    the last comment was mine , and another thing Anonymous. I must apologize for coming at you with such a harsh tone. I do agree that we do need to STOP spending our dollars on companies that do have us in mind. I also feel we should support our own. However I feel as if you are saying we should stop wearing makeup and things. Correct me if I am wrong. But if that is what you are saying then that is not going to happen. But I do agree with this “We stop patronizing them in a unified manner–as Tavis Smiley states, that’s the only way to hit their pocketbooks in a major way. ” Very smart statement indeed. And again I do apologize for the openended response to your first statement . Attacking you won’t change a thing.

  51. Anonymous on said:

    If you know for a fact, what are the names of these people of color in CEO/CFO positions? You keep missing my point. I’m saying if you don’t have names, you have nothing. That’s why I specified Linda Johnson Rice as Fashion-Fair owner–I’m still not wearing it because I refuse to look like a punching bag. But I’m glad the sister is handling her business, I have to give it to her. I am not angry; I’m disheartened that you’re overlooking good judgement and discernment.

    By the way, I mentioned Iman to highlight another point, not just the fact that the makeup line is owned by a majority establishment, because someone had so wisely mentioned that earlier. I reiterated what had been said previously about her to point out that at one point in time she DID own the product line, but relinquished it because the sales price was right. And, her being a woman and a person of color, this is very unfortunate. I feel it is better to have control and autonomy than quickly pad our pockets. But I guess this is far above your head, since you can’t comprehend that knowing actual NAMES in leadership positions is the only way you can know for certain a company is black-owned, minority-owned, female-owned etc.

    And I too am referring to women and people of color in general. Again, you’re not reading thoroughly. It’s just that I, as a black person, know that WE are so behind socioeconomically because of short-sighted commentary such as what you have made.

  52. Anonymous on said:

    Does ANYONE else out there understand the point I’m trying to get this person to prove? It is not just for my benefit; it’s for everybody’s. We make ourselves look so trite when we go spouting off non-empirical statements.

  53. Dayciaa on said:

    FYI…Minority Female Owned Cosmetics Companies with Female Minority CEOs:

    Fashion-Fair…Linda Johnson Rice

    H Couture Beauty…Taysha Smith Valez (24-year-old self-made millionaire and entrepreneur)

    Real Cosmetics…Lubna Khalid

    I believe both Marcie and Miss “Anonymous” have valid points. A number of companies Marcie mentioned are minority-female owned, but without the names it becomes a pointless debate. Let’s end this aspect of the conversation here and now, and instead discuss ways we might support these ambitious ladies in their endeavors, even if we do not, per se, care to wear their makeup products.

  54. Anonymous on said:

    I would like to thank Marcie for her input. I’ve been wearing Mary Kay because it is a “soft” makeup that goes easy on my skin, but now that I am aware of these other ladies’ businesses, I can explore other options. I apologize for becoming emotional. I’m just wanting us to keep building up our empowerment, however I did not mean to STOP wearing makeup at all, again “my bad” if that was misinterpreted. In fact, I’m glad we have our stake in the industry.

  55. london red on said:

    well I’m not suprised but having said that L’oreal and Ralph Lauren both featured advert campaigns in the uk with Indian actress Ashwaryia Rai and they didn’t dub over her accent. Its good to see a nationality that isn’t normally represented in the main stream western media getting work.

    I have seen the American advert with Ash in and shame on the yanks they dubed over her accent with a nasty American drool. So I have no doubt of the American L’oreal being racist.

  56. Marcie from Nebraska on said:

    Anonymous again I am so sorry for not naming names. Yes was was being very very slow. LOLOL. So sorry about that.

    CEO of H.Couture Beauty: Taysha Smith Valez ( I met this young lady , she is a force . She speaks french , spanish, and english! . You would love her even if you’re not a makeup person)

    Fashion Fair : Linda Johnson Rice.

    Real Cosmetics: Lubna Khalia ( I met her 2 years ago very nice woman very smart indeed , I found her point of view on beauty as a whole refreshing.)

    Global Goddess Shalini Vadhera

    In a nut shell you and I anon we are saying the same thing ( it just took me a while to process your points) and unlike others who are ok with the B.S. and Hoopla people give them Marcie does support all of these ladies.

  57. Landil on said:

    I have a feeling that things are going to change very very soon.! For the better. Enough is enough this is not 1942. hell its not 1999. Things are really going to change in this industry , its like chess. Like anonymous said ” I’m glad we have our stake in the industry.”.And some of “US” are going after All the dollars not just of color. Now that is History ! Lets hope “WE” don’t sabatoge the growth. Let all the above companies (and any not mentioned) fly and fight, they deserve a chance to be in this chess game of a industry . More like War of an industry!.

  58. Anonymous on said:

    A big fat BOOOO to Loreal.. Shame on you for even thinking that way.. preference for image is one thing but race?

    What does that have to do with anything anyhow?

  59. First animal testing, now racism? I’m so glad I stopped using L’Oreal a loooong time ago! They really need to get their act together!

  60. I’m really not surprised at such news. No matter how much we try there’s still people who think that the being white is of more superior race than the other. I really don’t buy L’oreal anyway but does it go for other brands under their wing also?

  61. London Red: nasty American drool? Now, who is the bigot?

    Seriously, I can’t really remember Aishwarya Rai’s voice being dubbed, but I’ll take your word for it. I do, however, know for sure that an older (maybe 2 years old) L’Oreal ad featuring Laetitia Casta had someone else’s unaccented voice coming out of her mouth. I also think that Patricia Velasquez (Covergirl) and Adriana Lima (Maybelline) might’ve both had their voices dubbed over at least once. (They spoke so briefly that I could barely tell.)

    And, while I agree that many of these companies are evidently racists, in this case, it seems to do more with the companies’ misperceptions that American women would not understand the spokesmodels or would not sit around to listen to accented women who they don’t really know.

    Penelope Cruz, who is mainstream (if ignored a bit) here, has not had her accent tampered with in the least.

  62. In light of the Paris riots only a few years ago this is troubling. You would think they would try to make strides in the right direction. Also, what about Sonya Rolland, the first Black Miss France? They French are truly double minded. I guess flaunting your racial ego is more important than making money.

  63. You know I was looking at Petra Nemcova’s show and wondering why there were no models of color and people were telling me I was looking for smoke where there was no fire, but when I read things like this I know nothing is accidental. I wonder which of her sponsor decreed ‘no blacks, jews or dogs’?

  64. Inky Loves Nature:

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    Specifically encouraging women of colour and then just woman period, to ignore popular culture’s perception of female beauty and to create and celebrate their own natural hair textures, individual beauty and style.

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    Alliances:

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    http://inkylovesnature.com

  65. Paprika on said:

    This merely reflects one aspect of a culture and is not necessarily an insidious black mark on France. For the France I know is not so self limiting but is quite rich in diversity – you just won’t find it with L’Oreal :) But this is simply the self important upper echelon in France consider themselves: all white. In other countries, similarly it’s all Arab or all American or all male….there is no one country or culture who has the franchise on being singular in their outlook. It happens everywhere. Personally, I find the word “minority group” very offensive and I never use that phrase even though it is very acceptable to use in the States. Use it here in Australia and you would get a very different reception.

    In Australia, ads are routinely dubbed with Australian accents so as to make them non threatening for viewers as well as understandable. Though we speak the same language, the vernacular is not the same.

    And, like the L’Oreal action, this is harmful to them rather than us as their products simply do not reflect the real world we live in and are treated as such. I’ve never used L’Oreal products anyway because they test on animals. Now that they have purchased the Body Shop, many people are unaware that products from there too are now also tested on animals. For me, this is a far more important issue.

  66. the only question is why is it that we still support and rate beyonce? she is one of the main faces for l’oreal….

  67. Deborah Weiler on said:

    I am a blue eyed blonde who was very touched by all these comments on racism. I actually believed this was no longer such a problem. I am so sorry that there are those who are still putting to much emphasis on outward appearance…ignoring the beauty that comes from a person’s heart. Ironic isn’t it, we are talking about products that stress attention to just that.

  68. Don’t Worry, Be Happy! =)

  69. I’m going to say it again, I am not surprised at a giant corporation being racist. What I am waiting for is Beyonce to allow her contract to expire. Now, Beyonce is beloved by many a young black girl, and their parents. Lets see how faithful she is to a healthy portion of her fan base.

  70. my god !this is very shocking news.thanks for ur post thats how v knw abt this.keep posting!

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